Articles tagged with: Emotional Intelligence

Leading With Emotional Intelligence

What sets one leader apart from another leader? Why do some leaders have an ability to motivate themselves and those around them to accomplish great things?

There are several factors that create success for a leader; however, Emotional Intelligence is being quickly rated among the top indicators. In the article "EQ vs. IQ - emotional intelligence, intelligence quotient", Cynthia L. Kemper states, “For those in leadership positions, emotional intelligence skills account for close to 90 percent of what distinguishes outstanding leaders from those judged as average.”

LeadingwithEmotionalIntelligence Braden2016


Always Leave a Place Better Than You Found It

Do you remember those things you mother always said to you?  Do you also remember when you realized those things she said were meaningful to life?   One of the things my mother used to always say was, "Always leave a place better than you found it".  She was referring to cleanliness.  She taught me when I stayed at someone's house, before leaving I should put clean sheets on the bed, empty the trash and make sure the rooms I used (including the bathroom) looked better than when I arrived.  I value this lesson and still live into it.  



Integrity and Leadership: Someone is Always Watching

A visit with my husband to one of our favorite yogurt shops compelled me to reflect and write on the topic of Integrity. This shop is a favorite of ours for many reasons. It has great service, is very clean, offers several choices, and provides an uplifting atmosphere. During our visit, we noticed something different from the moment we walked in. The floor was very dirty, the toppings were low and mixed together, and the cashier (who usually greets people as they come in and makes sure the counters are clean and the spoons are all upright and in the same position) was busy talking to his friend and was not the least bit interested in the customers or how the shop looked. A few moments later, I realized that two of the yogurt machines were frozen. I “interrupted” the cashier to ask for help with the frozen machines. Long story short, we finally got our yogurt, paid, and sat down to enjoy it. The challenge was that I could not enjoy mine. With the dirty atmosphere and my frustration rising, I continued to watch the cashier be uninterested in his work. Then, the straw that broke the camel’s back happened. It was about 10 minutes from closing time and I saw the friend of the cashier go over and help himself to a large serving of yogurt and toppings without paying. I could not be in integrity and remain quiet any longer. 



Negotiating With Emotional Intelligence

There are many opportunities in our lives and careers to negotiate for what we want:

·         The cost, scope or schedule of your next project

·         The sale price of a car or house

·         Your starting salary or vacation benefits for a new job

·         Your upcoming performance raise

Many notable authors and scholars have pointed out the advantages of using emotional intelligence in these scenarios.  My experience with these concepts is that I need to break them down in to very simple terms so that I can remember them in the “heat of the moment” and under the stress that negotiations typically put on us.




Emotional Intelligence - Is It the Foundation of Great Leadership?

Decades ago, this concept of Emotional Intelligence in leadership would not have appeared in many writings about what makes great leadership. There are plenty critics of the concept and its relationship to successful leaders. My intent is not to defend nor prove any research that has been done. Rather, I want to share my years of observation and study of leaders and the impact of EQ.  Let's start with the definition of Emotional Intelligence - skill in perceiving, understanding, and managing emotions and feelings.  There are more expanded and varying versions but this one captures the essence of the definition.






3 Keys to Building Trust in Your Leadership

Trust in leadership is on a decline1. There are several reasons for this, and the purpose of this white paper is to identify areas where leaders can focus to bring higher levels of trust.
The first question we should ask is, "Why is trust so important in an organization?" I believe that answer is in this quote from Sissela Bok, author of Lying:

Trust is a social good to be protected just as much as the air we breathe
or the water we drink. When it is damaged, the community as a whole
suffers; and, when it is destroyed, societies falter and collapse…Trust
and integrity are precious resources, easily squandered, hard to regain.

According to Patrick Lencioni’s model "The Five Dysfunctions of a Team,” trust is the foundation for all relationships. The workplace is all about people and relationships and that is why trust is crucial to the success of any organization.

So why is trust declining? There are three key reasons for declining trust:
1. Lack of vision
2. Fitting into the strategy
3. Uncertainty of values

Let’s break these key reasons down one at a time. The first is lack of vision or lack of understanding of the vision. An ancient Hebrew proverb says,

Where there is no vision, the people parish.

People need to know the vision of where the organization is headed and see a clear line of how to get there. Carly Fiorina said,

A leader's greatest obligation is to make possible an environment
where people's minds and hearts can be inventive, brave, human and strong...
where people can aspire to change the world.

http://www.ibew1613.org/library/notrust.html
Bok, Sissela. Lying: Moral Choice in Public and Private Life. Vintage Books, 1999.

 


What Does Your Leadership "Selfie" Look Like?

“Man in the Mirror” by Michael Jackson, is one of my favorite songs.  This song summarizes an important thought... if we want our world to be a better place, it begins with each one of us. If you buy in to the words of this song and want to be a change in the world.... you need to realize this includes being the change you want to see in your organizations as well. Being "the change and making a difference" requires a different way of thinking.  Ask yourself, “How do I engage with others? What is my leadership presence? Do I carry out my work with integrity?” 


The Price of Stress

Change is inevitable; it is not a matter of if but when.  Just about the time we have things figured out and in a good rhythm, something changes – for the positive or for the negative. And for many, change, or the results of change, can be stressful.

I am a strong advocate of raising your self-awareness in order to create the best life balance for yourself and keep your stress to a minimum.  Yet, we can read all the books in the world on life-balance, but when it comes down to it we have to know ourselves, set our boundaries and have accountability to follow through.




The ROI of Coaching

According to a study conducted in 2008 by PriceWaterHouseCoopers and Association Resource Centre, Inc., companies that use professional coaching reported a median return on investment of seven times their initial investment. The study was the result of a survey of corporate and individual clients of ICF (International Coach Federation) member coaches. It also found that individuals who participated in coaching reported a median return on investment of 3.44 times their investment...


The Dangers of Calling It Like You See It

Have you ever found yourself making this statement, “I just call it like I see it” or have you known a leader, friend or family member who says this?

Calling something as you “see” it can be strength. People are not left wondering what you think or how you feel, which can be refreshing and provide clear communication. So many leaders “beat around the bush” and their teams are not clear on what they want.

The challenge in “calling it like I see it” is one key word, “I.” We all see things differently in the world. One of the most thought provoking movies I have seen that illustrates this is the movie, Crash. If you have not seen the movie, I highly recommend it. It will open your eyes to your own personal judgments and the importance of creating strong paradigm shifts. Just about the time you think you have a character figured out in the movie, something shifts and your paradigm is rocked. You will find yourself in deep thought and mentally stimulated at the end of the movie.

Similar to Crash, in our leadership when we “call it like I see it,” we may learn that the way we see it could be very different from how another person sees it based upon their perspective.

I could place 5 people at 5 different vantage points to view an automobile accident. Each person would come back with a different story of what happened, simply based on the location from where they were able to view the accident. I am confident each person viewing the accident in this experiment would feel quite confident in their story based upon what they saw. They would each be “calling it like I see it.”

 

As leaders we need to guard against “calling it like I see it” until we know exactly what “it” is that “I” just “saw.” To help you, try the stop, look and listen technique:
  • Stop – and think before you judge or speak and ask yourself “is there another way to see this?”
  • Look – inside to determine how your beliefs, judgments and personal opinions could be affecting your response
  • Listen – ask someone else what they think, saw or concluded about the situation

 

Thinking before speaking, drawing judgment and conclusions will help in the following areas:
  1. You will reduce the times you have to come back and clean up a mess made based upon wrong assumptions you made
  2. You will build trust with people by not going straight to conclusions
  3. You will learn to broadly scan and take in all that could be going on and not just what you see from where you stand
  4. You will build relationships through asking for feedback to learn whether what you saw, judged, viewed, etc., is the same as what others observed.

 

I am sure there are other benefits to thinking before speaking, judging or drawing conclusions. What are your thoughts?