Articles tagged with: Relationship Management

Productive Conflict

Presented by Michelle Braden, CEO on Wednesday, 09 September 2015. Posted in Webinars, All Posts

MSBCoach Conflict Competency Model

 image

DATE: Wednesday, September 09, 2015
TIME: 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM EDT
COST: Free

Conflict is a normal and necessary part of healthy relationships yet is is one of the greatest challenges for most leaders. Some leaders completely avoid conflict at all cost and other leaders embrace it every chance they get ... which in turn, causes people to avoid them. As leaders we must learn to be confident in leading ourselves and others through proper conflict resolution. When a leader mismanages conflict it can harm relationships, break down trust and have long term results on projects… ultimately hitting the bottom line and affecting the entire organization. On the contrary when conflict is handled in a respectful and positive way, it creates the opportunity for the following:

  • growth
  • clarity
  • commitment
  • strengthens the bond between team members
  • increases buy-in

Through learning the skills you need for successful conflict resolution (which includes managing conflicts between your team members as a mediator), you can face disagreements with confidence and keep your personal and professional relationships strong and growing. 

 

 

Giving and Receiving Feedback

Written by Michelle Braden, CEO Posted in Webinars, All Posts

Giving and Receiving Feedback

Have you ever given or received feedback and it did not turn out at all the way you expected? In this webinar we will explore the SBI feedback model. This model is a powerful and useful tool in leadership and life for giving and receiving feedback in a safe manner. SBI is a model designed by the Center for Creative Leadership for self-evaluation and giving feedback to others.

SBI is an acronym that is defined below:

  • Situation: Describe the situation where the observed behavior occurred.
  • Behavior: Describe the person’s behavior (or your behavior) – physical, observable action.
  • Impact: Share with the person (or yourself) the impact of their behavior on you and others present.

There are several ways to engage the SBI model in your leadership. You can use it to observe yourself as a leader, work with your team, colleagues and boss. In this webinar we will take a deeper dive into using the SBI model, discuss how to use it effectively in your leadership.

 

Help! I'm Addicted to Micromanagement!

Written by Michelle Braden, CEO Posted in Blog, All Posts

While creating a training program for newly appointed managers,  I reflected on commonly faced challenges, as well as my own personal experiences. One of the greatest challenges I faced as a new manager was micromanagement. In fact, I may have been the worst micro-manager ever (to all of you out there that I may have micromanaged, I apologize).

Micro-Managing to Create “Mini-Mes”

Why Do New Managers Tend to Micro-Manage?

Micro-managing drove me crazy, so I know it drove my team crazy. As these embarrassing and painful growth experiences went through my mind I began to process through the reasons a new manager, or any leader, micromanages. I decided to throw the question out on Twitter™ and received great feedback from my Twitter world, including these answers:

  • Fear
  • Narcissism
  • Need to be in control
  • Lack of trust
  • Do not know how to let go
  • Need for perfection
  • Don’t think anyone can do it as well as they can
  • Someone may get more credit or recognition than them
  • Do not know what else to do

I think all these suggestions can be correct for different people in different situations. Upon pondering my own personal reasons for micromanaging, I found several of these to be true. I was a star individual performer who was promoted to management without any training in leadership. I knew how to do my job well as an individual performer. Once I was promoted, therefore, it made sense to create “mini-mes”. This is a really bad idea. It’s not a way to win friends and influence people. I thought that to increase someone’s performance all they needed to do was to do exactly what I did before I was promoted. I thought this would make them successful, thus making me successful – huge misconception. I know to those of you in leadership, this is obvious, but more often than not, it is not obvious to a new manager.

I was also fearful. I still made bonuses, but they were no longer based  on my individual performance. Instead, they were based on the team’s performance. In my young mind, this made it even more reason to create little “Me Robots.” If they could do the job exactly as I did, they could generate the same revenue I did, and we should all be happy… right?

As with most new leaders I was tapping into familiarity. I was doing what I knew how to do, but what I was doing was not producing the results I hoped for. It was not until one of my team members was leaving the organization that I had to face the truth. His parting comment to me was “you use the word team all the time, but there is no team here.” It was then that I realized that what I was doing was not working. I decided to educate myself on the skills of leadership. Following are the seven things I learned that helped me to regain perspective.

7 Tips to Help Micro-Managing Leaders:

  1. Recognize that micromanagement causes people to become resentful or turn their brains off: Why should they think if you are doing all the thinking for them?
  2. Become the leader of the team and not the star performer.
  3. Get to know your team members individually, learn what their strengths are and how to motivate them.
  4. Trust that they are able to succeed in their own way, and give them the room to grow and develop.
  5. Create a safe environment for innovation, creative ideas and new processes.
  6. Keep  in mind that NO ONE is motivated by micromanagement, no matter what the reason.
  7. Never be afraid to have a team of people who are smarter than you. When the team shines, the leader shines!

All aspects of the leadership journey are part of an insightful learning process. We never “arrive” and we are always gathering new information to apply. As leaders, it is meaningful to reflect on our journeys, seeking ways to improve our methods and style. As you reflect on your own journey, ask yourself what you have learned and how you can help new managers along the way.

Why do you think leaders micromanage? Do you have some tips to help micro-managing leaders overcome this addiction? Please share  you thoughts by leaving a comment to this article.

Strategic Transformation: The HOW Matters!

Written by Stasia Rice Posted in Blog, All Posts

Strategic Transformation Series: Post 3

Thanks for joining us again for the third post for the Strategic Transformation Series. In the first two entries we talked about The Strategy and Engagement Connection & To Plan or To Transform? We look forward to your comments and questions as we dive into how strategic planning can not only enhance your company’s bottom line, but the engagement of your employees as well.

True transformation comes down to Intent. If our intention is to truly transform our organization through strategic planning, then that significant intention will require significant action.

Create a Strong Foundation If your last strategic plan is collecting dust on the shelf, let me ask you a few questions:

  1. How organized was the pre-planning? Did you identify stakeholders, decision makers, timelines and milestones?
  2. Was the rest of the organization well informed of this plan? Did you continue to communicate transparently and frequently?
  3. Were the right people involved? Did you have enough diversity of experience, subject matter expertise and perspectives to create a full picture?
  4. What historical information was gathered and provided to the team? Did they know what worked and didn’t work in the past?
  5. Were the leaders of your organization in the right frame of mind and open to thinking big about the possibilities for the future?
  6. Was the team prepared to communicate effectively and deal appropriately with conflict? Was there a designated facilitator?

By answering YES to these questions, we show our intent to create strong foundation for success by HOW we prepare. Important work and we haven’t even started the planning! This important phase of creating cultural preparedness for your organization will help you create that all important buy-in from your teams that you need to have the transformation you desire.

Define the Future

Once you’ve created the foundation, it’s time to get to the business of planning. Here are some things to consider as you create the high level strategy that we are all familiar with.

  1. Is your mission and vision clear? Does everyone have the same understanding and clarity that you need to move forward?
  2. When’s the last time you took inventory of everything that your organization does? You might be surprised how many “I didn’t know we did that…” comments you hear around the room.
  3. Are they the right activities? What would you like to be doing? How would you enhance those activities? What would it take to get there?

Strategy, at its heart, is about great communication. Remember – this intent is that this strategy be something everyone in your organization understands and lives by. Be mindful of the strong foundation and work to develop the goals and objectives collaboratively and interactively through a series of facilitated sessions that draw upon all stakeholders’ input and perspectives.

As you write the plan, keep the messaging clear, concise and actionable. Less is more. Consider a strategy map to help as a communication tool that can help to internalize this strategy in your culture.

The Plan to Get There

The typical next step is to issue the plan to the entire organization and instruct that they cascade the high-level goals and objectives into their operational divisions. We might even instruct that performance goals be tied to this strategy.

This all sounds good, in theory. However, Implementation Planning is often missing key results such as:

  • opportunities for collaboration between divisions to execute the goals
  • collective priority setting and coordination
  • adequate resources to execute across the organization
  • measurement of progress and enhanced performance

HOW you plan to implement the strategy is key to its success. Don’t let all that hard work go to waste; be sure to create a consistent process by which divisions are creating work plans that contribute to an overarching organizational work plan. Then work collaboratively to ensure the proper priorities and resources are allocated to TRANSFORM your organization!

MSBC brings an innovative approach and a team with extensive experience to guide your leadership through this Strategic Transformation process. Let us know if you like to learn more at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Our Certifications.

Contact us.

  • Meet us.
    224 9th Street SW
    Charlottesville, VA 22903

    (+804) 502 4319
    (+434) 293 5758
  • Write us.
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Follow us.